Sowing the Seeds VI: A workshop for early career medieval economic and social historians

 

Sowing the Seeds VI: A workshop for early career medieval economic and social historians

Sowing the Seeds is a one-day workshop to be held at the London School of Economics on June 15, 2019. The workshop will bring together doctoral students and early-career researchers, from an array of historical and economics backgrounds, together with more senior academics in a stimulating environment. This will facilitate exciting opportunities for cross-pollination, knowledge pooling and networking.

The conference will feature a keynote presentation from Dr. Chris Briggs (Cambridge) and a round-table discussion with Professor Greg Clark (UC Davis) and Dr. Daniel Curtis (Erasmus University Rotterdam).

With generous funding from the Department of Economic history at LSE, the Economic History Society and the Royal Historical Society, we can offer free registration. We also hope to offer travel bursaries of up to £75 for eligible students and early-career researchers (ECRs are defined as those without a permanent academic post during the 2018-19 academic year).

Please see the Call for Papers (below) for more details. Please submit proposals of 300 words to Spike Gibbs (a.s.gibbs@lse.ac.uk) by March 15, 2019. Any other queries can be directed to Jordan Claridge (j.claridge@lse.ac.uk).

In recent years medieval economic and social history has increasingly informed the big historical debates. More economically-inclined medievalists have located the antecedents of industrialization and economic divergence in the Middle Ages. The period has emerged as a crucial point for understanding the transition to modern economic growth. These question in particular have benefitted from an increasing ability to analyze ever larger datasets in increasingly complex ways. In addition, approaches from other disciplines, such as material culture and legal anthropology, have shed new light on the mentalities of ordinary medieval people. New explorations of the impacts of crises like plagues and wars have also improved our understanding of the resiliency (or lack thereof) of medieval societies. Medievalists are asking important historical questions and employing a broad range of methodologies on previously unexplored sources. This is illustrative of the vitality the discipline in 2019.
However, the new interdisciplinary nature of medieval economic history has led to the formation of chasms between these various approaches. Some have even questioned whether medieval economic and social history can exist as its own discipline and still remain relevant. Should the Middle Ages become a laboratory for more mainstream historical disciplines, or is there something distinctive and unifying about studying the Middle Ages? Can medieval economic and social historians using significantly different methods and asking very different questions still engage in meaningful discourse with each other?
This workshop is designed to bring together doctoral students and early-career researchers, from an array of historical and economic backgrounds, together with senior academics in a stimulating environment to address these issues head-on. This will facilitate exciting opportunities for cross-pollination, knowledge pooling and networking. The conference will feature a keynote presentation from Dr. Chris Briggs (Cambridge) and a round-table discussion with Professor Greg Clark (UC Davis) and Dr. Daniel Curtis (Erasmus University Rotterdam).
Proposals for papers are welcomed from PhD students and early-career researchers of all methodological and theoretical backgrounds on any aspect of medieval social and economic history. Regional and temporal boundaries are broadly defined and we welcome papers from scholars working beyond medieval Europe. Proposals are encouraged to include both a methodological and/or theoretical component (methodological framework and tools employed; benefits or disadvantages of a given approach; use of sources) as well as substantive results. In the case of PhD students, preliminary results and/or case-studies are acceptable).
Papers will be twenty minutes in length with time for questions. Please submit proposals of 300 words to Spike Gibbs (a.s.gibbs@lse.ac.uk) by March 15, 2019. Any other queries can be directed to Jordan Claridge (j.claridge@lse.ac.uk).
With generous funding from the Department of Economic history at LSE, the Economic History Society and the Royal Historical Society, we can offer free registration. We also hope to offer travel bursaries of up to £75 for eligible students and early-career researchers (ECRs are defined as those without a permanent academic post during the 2018-19 academic year).

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